Category Archives: Relishes

Relish Recipes and a Sour Pickle

While the only two thriving plants I have left in the garden continue to beat the 100 degree weather we’re having, I’m in the mood for sharing canning recipes.  Oh, that’s the tomatoes and cantalopes, btw. :O)
I love old recipes they have that authoritive feel of “this is how we orginally made this”.

These recipes are from a cookbook I have called “The Household Search Light Recipe Book” by The Household Magazine, Topeka, Kansas, 1939.

NOTES:
Some of these recipes do not mention what to do with the end result.  I would place the ‘end result’ in sterilized jars, put lids on and place in a boiling water bath for 10 to 15 minutes. (See previous Post for Boiling Water Bath instructions.) 

Also as I type these I can’t help but wonder if the mustard listed in most of these recipes is ‘powdered/ground mustard seed’ and not the condinment ‘prepared mustard’.  Did they have that back in 1939?  I would be more inclined to use powdered/ground mustard seed.

A peck is 1/4 of a bushel. In dry measure it is 8 quarts.
1 US Bushel = 9.30917797 Gallons
Sour Pickles
     Select 50 tiny cucumbers.  Wash.  Cover with cold water.  Handle as little as possible to avoid bruises.  Let stand 2 hours.  Drain.  Cover with boiling water to which 3/4 cup salt has been added.  Cover and let stand 2 days.  Drain.  Discard all cucumbers that are not solid and in good condition.  Pack in sterilized jars.  Cover with the following pickling liquid, which should be hot but not boiling:  To sufficient vinegar to cover the pickles add 3 chopped green peppers, 1/4 cup salt, 6 whole allspice, 6 peppercorns, 1 1/2 sticks cinnamon, 1 blade mace (1 tsp. mace), 1 bay leaf, 1 small onion, minced, and 1 1/2 tablespoons mustard seed.  Pickles will be ready for use after 8 weeks. – The Household Searchlight.
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Mustard Pickles

2 cups cubed cucumbers
4 cups small green halved tomatoes
2 cups small cucumbers
2 cups small onions
4 cups coarsely chopped large green tomatoes
6 green peppers, cut in strips
1/2 cup salt
3 cups sugar
1/2 pound mustard
1 cup flour
2 heads cauliflower, broken in flowerets
3 quarts vinegar
2 Tablespoons Turmeric
1/2 cup vinegar

Heat 3 quarts vinegar to boiling.  Add vegetables, except cucumbers, and scald thoroughly.  Remove vegetables.  Combine sugar, turmeric, mustard, salt and flour.  Blend to a smooth paste with 1/2 cup vinegar.

 Add to boiling vinegar, stirring constantly.  Cook until thick and smooth.  Add all vegetables, including cucumbers.  Stir until well blended.  Heat thoroughly.  –  Florence Taft Eaton, Concord, Mass.
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Pickled Carrots

Small carrots
Salt
2 cups sugar
2 cups vinegar
2 cups water
1 Tablespoon whole mixed spices

Scrape and wash carrots.  Boil until tender in water to which 1/2 tsp. salt has been added per quart.  Pack in sterilized jars.  Fill jars to within 1/4 inch of top with sirup made by boiling together vinegar, water, sugar, and spices.  –  Mrs. Harry R. Baer, Mayersdale, Pa.
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This sounds interesting to make, but I’m not sure what dish you would eat it with.  And what would you sew the tops on the peppers with?. – AR Farmerette

(Pickled) Stuffed Green Peppers

Green Peppers
1 quart chopped onions
2 tablespoons mustard
2 cups vinegar
1 small head cabbage
6 pimientos, chopped
1/2 c. brown sugar
1 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon allspice

Select large firm peppers.  Cut off tops.  Remove seeds.  Shred cabbage.  Combine with pimientos, onions, vinegar, mustard, sugar, pepper and allspice.  Heat to boiling.  Stuff peppers firmly with this mixture.  Sew tops on peppers.  Pack in jars.  Cover with vinegar which has been diluted in the proportion of 1 part vinegar to 2 parts water.  –  Mrs. C.S. Campbell, Hopkinsville, Ky.
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Rochester Relish

1/2 peck ripe tomatoes
12 Sweet Peppers – 1/2 green and 1/2 red
6 cups brown sugar
1 Teaspoon mustard
1 Tablespoon broken stick cinnamon
1 Tablespoon allspice
1/2 peck green tomatoes
12 small onions
2 or 3 stalks celery
2 quarts vinegar
1 Tablespoon cloves
1/4 Teaspoon mace
1 cup salt

Chop tomatoes, peppers, onions, and celery, coarsely.  Add salt and allow to stand overnight.  Drain.  Heat vinegar to boiling.  Add sugar, mustard. and spices. (Do not put spices in a bag.)  Add chopped vegetables to boiling vinegar.  Stir until well blended.  Simmer briskly 1/2 hour.  –  Florence Taft Eaton, Concord, Mass.
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Fanwood Chow-Chow

1 peck Ripe tomatoes
2 cups chopped onions
2 Tablespoons salt
1 Tablespoon celery seed
2 apples, chopped
1/4 Teaspoon red pepper
1 Teaspoon whole cloves
2 cups vinegar
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
1 Tablespoon broken stick cinnamon
1 Tablespoon mustard

Scald, peel, and slice tomatoes.  Chop onions.  Sprinkle with salt.  Allow to stand 2 hours.  Drain.  Add apples and boil slowly for 2 hours.  Add vinegar, brown sugar, mustard, red pepper, celery seed, cinnamon, and cloves.  More salt may be added if desired.  Simmer about 1/2 hour.  –  Florence Taft Eaton, Concord, Mass.
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Canning Recipes

I was looking through one of my mother’s old cookbooks today and found some canning recipes to share.  The book is called ‘The Lily Wallace New American Cook Book’ printed in 1941.

While these recipes do not call for a boiling water bath, I would do it just the same, for at least 10 to 15 mins.
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The Boiling-Water Bath
     For processing acid foods, the water bath is the most generally saisfactory method in the home.  The water is boiled in an open vessel or in one in which the top is not clamped down.  In processing fruits and other acid food in the water bath, be sure that the jars are far enough apart and that the rack on which they are supported is so arranged that the water can circulate freely under and around them.
     Have the water in the vessel or canner boiling before putting in the jars of food.  In order to keep the glass jars from breaking they must be preheated in water or filled with hot food.
     When the jars are in the vessel or canner, see taht the water come over the tops at least 1 or 2 inches.  Add more boiling water as needed to keep this level.
     Count time as soon as the water begins to boil vigorously.  Keep the bath boiling constantly during all of the processing period.
     As soon as the processing time is up, remove the glass jars from the water one at a time and place on a towel in a draft-free place.  Do not tip or shake the jars until they have cooled and sealed.

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Chili Sauce

4 quarts chopped and peeled tomatoes
2 cups chopped onions
1 cup chopped sweet red pepper
1 cup chopped green pepper
1 small hot, red pepper
3 Tbsp. salt
1/2 cup sugar
1 Tbsp. white mustard seed
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. allspice
2 1/2 cups vinegar

     Combine the vegetables, salt, and sugar, and cook until the mixture begins to thicken. 
     Add vinegar and whole spices, in bag, and cook until the mixture becomes a thick sauce.
     Pour into hot jars and seal immediately. 
  NOTE: Drain juice from vegetables before adding vinegar.  This will shorten the cooking period.
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Bread and Butter Pickles

6 quarts sliced medium cucumbers
1 1/2 quarts vinegar
6 cups sugar
6 onions, medium-sized, sliced
1 cup salt
1/2 cup mustard seed
1 tablespoon celery seed
1/4 to 1/3 teaspoon cayenne pepper

     Combine cucumbers, onions, and salt and let stand 3 hours.  Drain.  Combine seasoning and vinegar and boil.
     Add cucumbers and onions.  Heat to simmering and pack hot.  Be careful to avoid boiling as that makes pickles soft.  Pack while hot in clean jars and seal immediately.
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Chutney

24 ripe tomatoes, medium-sized
6 onions, medium-sized
3 red peppers
3 green peppers
12 tart apples
1 pound seedless raisins
1 cup celery. cut fine
2 quarts vinegar
3 cups sugar
Salt

Chop vegetables first and then the apples.  Cut celery. Combine ingredients and cook chutney until it is thick and clear.  Pour immediately into clean hot jars, and seal at once.

 
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Dill Pickle Relish

Gifted vegies are the best; ‘course the ones you grow are too. :O)  Anyway,  I was given a long cucumber and I don’t like to eat them raw, so I made 3 half-pint jars of Dill Pickle Relish.
Dill Pickle Relish
Dill Pickle Relish

2 cups chopped cucumber
1 cup chopped small green tomatoes
1/3 cup red bell pepper
1 cup cider vinegar
3 tsp. dill seed
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 1/2 tsp. canning salt

Place all ingredients in an enamel or stainless steel pot.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer.  Simmer for 10 minutes.
Ladle into jars and seal.  Place in boiling water bath for 15 minutes.  Remove, sit on a towel, and wait for the popping sealing sound.

Historic recipes – PICCALILLI

    I am an avid recipe collector and I love to read recipes and recipe books.  Searching the “recipe web” (pun) one day I happened across Feeding America (The Historic American Cookbook Project) 
http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/index.html      This site has over 50 cookbooks for people to read.  Each cookbook has a regular text page or a PDF to download.  As a recipe nut I love to read how people used to cook and compare to today’s cooking practices.  Of course there is the true orginality to a recipe that intriques me; meaning ‘this is how they used to make it’.
    Last night I looked through a few of the historic cookbooks and copied some of the canning recipes. 

Today I’ll post one and tomorrow I’ll make a long post with more of the canning recipes.

This recipe is from JENNIE JUNE’S AMERICAN COOKERY BOOK
BY MRS. J. C. CROLY, (JENNIE JUNE.)   1866

PICCALILLI
Use all kinds of vegetables that may be pickled. Slice cabbages, and pull cauliflowers in bunches, put them on earthen dishes, sprinkled over with salt, and let them stand three days to dry. Sliced cucumbers, green tomatoes, gherkins, radish pods, onions, beans, nasturtiums and anything you like that may be pickled, put it into salt and water one day. The next day dry them; take a few at a time and scald in brown vinegar, and when all are scalded, set the vinegar away. To four quarts of brown vinegar, put a quarter of a pound of ginger, two ounces of allspice, quarter of a pound of shallots, two ounces of tumeric, and boil slowly half an hour. Take some boiling vinegar, and mix eight ounces of flour of mustard and pour it into the vinegar and spices; it must not boil after the mustard is put in. Put the prepared vegetables and spices in a large jar, scatter some brown mustard seed among the mixture, and stir it up well in the jar. If at any time it should become too dry, add cold boiled vinegar; for the vegetable must be kept covered with vinegar mixture. Cover the jar air tight and set in a cool place.

Green Tomatoes

Hoping everyone’s week went well.  It is still HOT here.  I was told that last night at 9:00p.m. it was 92 degrees outside my house.  The air conditioner is getting a workout this summer.  We’re promised scattered thunderstorms this weekend and I am ready; even a quick downpour would be nice.
    1:30p.m.  A friend of mine gave me some green tomatoes to make my Green Tomato Relish, but I don’t have any Tumeric or whole mustard seeds and I forgot to buy the  (AH!  I hear thunder!) cabbage.  So I decided to make my fave Green Tomato Pickles with Onions; espically since the tomatoes are in the fridge, salted and drained.  I’ve been making these for 5 years now.  I love it when, at the end of the season, someone says “come get all these green tomatoes before the frost gets them”.   You’ll find the recipe and photos for my Green Tomato Relish on last years garden Blog.  Here: Green Tomato Relish
http://arkansasfarmerette.wordpress.com/2011/10/29/green-tomato-relish/


Here is the recipe Green Tomato Pickles with Onions recipe I make:

1 gallon sliced tomatoes – 16 cups
2 cups sliced onions
1.4 c. canning or pickling salt
4 c. vinegar (I use apple cider vinegar)
3 cups brown sugar
1 tablespoon whole cloves
1 tablespoon allspice
1 tablespoon celery seed
1 tablespoon mustard seed

1.  Slice tomatoes and onions,  Sprinkle with 1/4 c. salt and let stand 4 to 6 hours.  Drain.
2.  Heat and stir sugar into vinegar until dissolved.  Tie cloves, allspice, celery, and mustard seeing a cheesecloth or spice bag.  Add to vinegar with tomatoes and onions.  Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes, stirring as needed to prevent sorching.  Tomatoes should be tender and transparent when properly cooked.
3.  Remove spice bag.  Fill jars and cover with vinegar solution.  Leave 1/2-inch headspace.  Adjust lids and process in boiling water bath canner; 10 minutes for pints, 15 minutes for quarts.
4.  This recipe yields about 9 pints.

Notes:  I like my tomatoes and onions chunky so I quarter them.  I split apart the onion layers so they will cook better and you’ll get more in each jar that way.
 
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Oh yeah I mentioned thunder eariler in this post…

RAIN!!!  It has been raining nice and slow for an hour and the temp is so much cooler.  Yeah!!!

Canning Potatoes and Corn Relish

6-30-12
The potato plants are drying out at different times; some are still green and some have been dry for a week or more.  This morning at 6:30 I went up into the garden and dug up 17 of the dry plants.  Believe me hunting in the dirt for potatoes is not easy work.  I think I only sliced through 3 potatoes with my shovel.  After an hour of digging the sun starting coming up over the tree line and I was getting tired so I stopped; covered in sweat.  There are still about 15 or so dry potato plants to dig up and I’ll be out there in the morning doing it all over again.
   
Once I finished with the potato digging I decided to make my corn relish before canning the potatoes.  This is a recipe I made up.


Southwest Style Corn Relish

Makes 2 pints

2 cups fresh corn
1 1/2 cups tomatoes, seeds removed and chopped
1/2 cup red bell pepper, chopped
1 1/2 cups onion, chopped
1 1/2 tsp canning salt
1/2 c. cider vinegar
3 Tbsp. cilantro
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 c. brown sugar
1/4 c. lime juice

Place all ingredients in an enamel or stainless steel pan. (A large stainless saucepan is big enough.)
Bring to a boil and let boil for 15 minutes.
While relish is boiling get your jars and boiling water bath ready.
Fill jars with hot relish and place on your lids and tighten the rings.
Place in boiling water bath. (Remember the boiling water should cover your jars by 1-inch.)  Leave in boiling water bath for 15 minutes.  Remove jars; sitting them in a draft free place.  Wait for the lid popping sound and you’re done.

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 After putting the relish away I canned 4 quarts of the potatoes I picked this morning.  The recipe and instructions I used came from my Kerr Canning Book.

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7-1-12
    Dug up more of the potato plants this morning; 18 today leaving 10 green plants up in the garden.  Dug up another wash tub full.  I canned another 4 quarts.  There were lots of little ones attached to the large potatoes and some small ones so I decided to put them away in pint jars for stew this winter.  I don’t know why I insist on putting myself through all this work.  I guess I just can’t throw good food away.
    To prepare the little ones I stood at the sink using my dish scrunchy and rubbed all skin off each one under running water.  I had to trim off each one.  Potatoes have a tendency to turn brown after they’ve been peeled for a while so I place them in a bowl of cool water with a squirt or two of lemon juice.  I always rinse them before I place them in the jars.  I do the same lemon water soak with my cut potatoes I placed in the quart jars.

It was a busy weekend and I could use a day off now. :O)  I will say I enjoyed myself.  I LOVE TO CAN.  Have I mentioned that?
The weekend was a hot as the week and the fields, woods,and creeks are drying up.  I heard they have banned fireworks in our county and the next one (Fort Smith,AR’s county).  Guess the 4th won’t be much of one unless we get a good soaking rain for a day.  We’ve deer on our property that graze in our field behind the garden and drink from a spring just down below the hill from our house.  We’ve seen generations of these same deer over the years and one doe has had several sets of twins.  Dad and I went out for supper this evening and on the way in we saw four of them by the spring.  They just stood there and looked at us as we drove by.  I saw the buck in the back field last Thursday.  It was the first time I’ve seen him in the open.
     Well enough about the pretty deer.  Hope everyone had a GREAT weekend and the same for the week to come.

Sharing Relish Recipes


Green Tomato Relish posted on last years Blog.  Find the recipe at
http://arkansasfarmerette.wordpress.com/2011/10/29/green-tomato-relish/

I love making relishes and green tomato pickles.  Here’s a few tips I’ve learned along the way.
1. When the recipe calls for “sprinkling the vegetables with salt, let sit overnight,and drain & squeeze out the water”;  just put them in a large colander or colanders over a pan(s).  Let drain this way and you won’t have any squeezing to do the next day.
2.  I used to tie my spices in an old tea towel, but I lucked upon a large mesh tea ball at a Whole Foods store.  If you can’t find one, cheese cloth works well.  

I am a cookbook collector, of sorts.  I recently picked up some recipe pamphlets at a local resale shop. 
I thought I would share some of the recipes in them with all of you just to whet your appetite for canning.
The following recipes are from Circular 458 (REV) Pickles and Relishes, Agricultural Extension Service, University of Arkansas, May 1962

Pepper Relish
1 pt. sweet red peppers, chopped
1 pt. sweet green peppers, chopped
1 pt. onions, chopped
1 pt. vinegar
1 Tbsp. canning salt
1 c. sugar
2 tsp. crushed celery seed
2 tsp. mustard seed
(If desired the green peppers can be omitted and 1 qt. of red peppers used.)
Cover onions and pepper with water.  Bring the water to a boil, then remove from the heat.  Let onions and peppers stand in the water 10 minutes before draining.  Mix sugar, vinegar, and spices.  Bring to a boil, then add onions and peppers.  Cook slowly for 15 minutes.  Then pack in hot jars, seal and store.

Piccalilli
2 qts green tomatoes, chopped
3 c. green sweet peppers, chopped
1 c. cucumbers, chopped
1/2 c. onions, chopped
1 qt. vinegar
1 c. brown sugar
1/2 c. canning salt
2 Tbsp. pickling spice (tied in a cloth)

Combine the chopped vegetables and mix with the salt.  Let this mixture stand overnight.  Next morning, drain and press out all the liquid possible.  Mix sugar, vinegar, and spices (tied in a cloth).
Bring to a boil, then add the vegetables.  Simmer slowly about 30 minutes, or until thick.  Pack into hot jars, seal and store.

Corn Relish
2 qts. cut corm (12 to 15 ears)
1 at. chopped cabbage
1 c. green sweet pepper, chopped
1 c. red sweet pepper, chopped
1 c. onions, chopped
1 c. sugar
1 qt. vinegar
2 Tbsp. ground dry mustard
1 Tbsp. celery seed
1 Tbsp. canning salt

Boil the ears of corn in water for 3 minutes to “set the milk.”  Then cool them and cut the corn from the cob.  Mix pepper, onion, and cabbage with the corn.  Add vinegar, sugar, and spices to the mixture.
Cook about 20 minutes, or until tender.  Pack into hot jars, seal and store.

Chow Chow
1 qt. cabbage,, chopped
1 qt. cucumbers, chopped
1 qt. green tomatoes, chopped
1/2 c. green peppers, chopped
1 1/2 qts. vinegar
1 1/2 c. sugar
1 Tbsp. celery seed
1 Tbsp. mustard seed
1 Tbsp. allspice
1/2 c. canning salt

Mix vegetables and salt, then let stand overnight. Next morning drain and press out all liquid.  Combine vinegar, sugar, and spices.  Simmer 10 minutes.  Add vegetables and cook until hot and well seasoned.  Pack into hot jars, seal and store.

Chili Sauce
   For a good red color in this product, observe these four points:
1. Use ripe red tomatoes.
2. Cook rapidly in a large open pan.
3. Use whole spices instead of powdered ones.
4. Add sugar and vinegar near the end of the cooking time.
Ingredients
1 gallon chopped ripe tomatoes, peeled
2 c. chopped onion
2 c. chopped sweet red peppers
3 Tbsp. canning salt
1 c. brown sugar
3 c. vinegar
1 red hot pepper (if desired)
1 tsp. whole cloves
1 tsp. allspice
2 tsp. cinnamon
1 med. clove (section) of garlic

Combine chopped vegetables.  Tie spices in a bag and add to vegetables.  Cook vegetables rapidly, stirring often to keep from sticking.  When the vegetables have cooked down to about half the amount you started with, add the sugar, vinegar, and salt.  Boil rapidly for 5 minutes, stirring constantly.  Pour into hot jars, seal, and store.
NOTE: The vinegar, sugar and salt can be heated separately and added while hot to the vegetables.  In this way, the mixture is not cooled down too much.